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Susanne Porter ABR, CRS, GRI
440 South West End Blvd, RT 309
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 Phone: 267-261-4608
Office Phone: 215-538-4400
Cell: 267-261-4608
Fax: 267-354-6883 
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Susanne Porter ABR, CRS, GRI

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The Most Common Mistakes Job Seekers Make—and How to Avoid Them

August 2, 2016 2:10 am


Anyone who’s braved the job market knows how difficult the application process can be. One mistake, and the effort is wasted.

CareerBuilder®’s Chief Human Resources Officer Rosemary Haefner says most mistakes are avoidable.

“Workers realize that the job market is stronger than it has been over the last eight years, and technology is allowing them to pursue new opportunities faster and more efficiently than ever,” said Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer for CareerBuilder, in a statement. “But, just because they are able to submit an application easier, doesn't mean candidates can skip basic steps—or requirements—like submitting a cover letter or customizing their résumés. These items get the attention of recruiters and hiring managers, and leaving them out of the process can hurt a job seeker's chances of securing a new job.”

One common mistake, according to Haefner, is not customizing a résumé for each prospective employer. Employers can spot all-purpose résumés a mile away—tailoring your résumé to match key words in the job description can make all the difference.

Another mistake job seekers regularly make is not personalizing the application. Haefner says applying directly to the hiring manager not only increases your chances of being noticed, but also shows you’ve gone the extra step and invested time getting to know the company.

Job seekers are also often caught not including cover letter with the application. Cover letters are an opportunity that should not be squandered, Haefner says. A letter allows you to introduce yourself, as well as sell your experience and skills beyond what’s presented in your résumé.

Many job seekers are guilty of not following up with an employer after applying, Haefner adds. This mistake can be significant—often, a hiring manager is overwhelmed by applications, and following up is the only way to ensure they’ve received and considered yours.

One of the most egregious mistakes, Haefner says, is not sending a thank-you note after an interview. Most hiring managers expect a thank-you in some form or another—forgoing this action will not go unnoticed.

Job seekers must take extra care when it comes to all aspects of the hiring process, Haefner concludes. Begin by avoiding the most common mistakes!

Source: CareerBuilder®
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Tips for a Cooler Home

August 2, 2016 2:10 am


Relief from the heat can be hard to come by in August, when the mercury tends to rise to uncomfortably high temperatures. In times like these, many homeowners consume excess energy, and incur higher-than-normal costs.

“People have the power to lower energy costs even on the hottest days of the year,” says Brian Rich, chief information officer and senior vice president of Customer Experience of Consumers Energy.

One of the simplest ways to do that, Rich says, is to raise the air conditioning thermostat by a few degrees when the house is unoccupied. When members of the household are home, Rich recommends keeping the temperature at a constant 78 degrees.

Consider cooling only areas that see use, Rich adds. Keep all doors and registers in these rooms closed—doing so will not only prevent cool air from escaping, but also keep the air conditioning unit from consuming too much energy.

Closing window treatments during the daytime is also wise. Rich says blocking the rays of the sun when they’re at their strongest noticeably cools the home, and also spares the air conditioning unit the power needed to cool a sun-filled house.

Avoid using heat-producing appliances, as well, Rich says, especially at peak temperatures during the day. This includes the stove and the dryer.

Lastly, consider having your air conditioning unit tuned up. At minimum, clean the filter regularly, Rich advises.

Source: Consumers Energy
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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10 Stress-Less Tips for a Move

August 2, 2016 2:10 am


(BPT)—Do you know upwards of 15 million people move during peak real estate season?

Moving is an exciting time, but can also be overwhelming. Take the stress out of the process with these tips, courtesy of Penske Truck Rental:

1. Prepare to pack. Save time by ordering moving supplies, such as boxes, bubble wrap, labels and tape in advance online.

2. Purge. Less is more when it comes to moving. Donate, sell or toss items that you no longer use, rather than pack them.

3. Reserve a truck early. Reserve a moving truck at least two weeks ahead of your move. Allow 150 cubic feet of truck space for each fully-furnished.

4. Pack smart. Start the packing process by boxing up out-of-season and non-essential items. Leave a box open, if necessary—it's easier to tape a box shut on moving day than it is to pack it at the last minute.

5. Label well. Labeling can save you hours of unpacking. Begin by labeling each box with the room it belongs in, followed by details about the contents, such as “fragile.” (Bonus Tip: Keep boxes from the same room grouped together on the truck.)

6. Transfer services. Contact your service and utility providers to discontinue cable, gas, electricity, refuse collection and water. Schedule the cut-off for a day or two after your move, in case there is a delay due to unforeseen circumstances.

7. Pick up the truck the night before. Pick up your truck rental the evening before the move to save time on moving day. Get familiarized with the vehicle and verify the best driving directions to your new home.

8. Start early. Depart early in the morning to avoid traffic and allow extra time to unload at your new home.

9. Drive wise. Moving trucks require more distance to stop. Be aware of low-hanging tree branches and building overhangs. Park only in well-lit areas, and keep the rear door padlocked and the passenger compartment doors locked.

10. Keep important items on-hand. Pack a road trip bag to keep your phone, paperwork, credit cards, identification, a set of clothes, beverages and snacks close at hand while you drive.

Source: Penske Truck Rental (PenskeTruckRental.com)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Are You Guilty of 'Phubbing?'

August 1, 2016 2:10 am


“Phubbing,” or choosing to interact with a smartphone instead of a person, is all but accepted. Millennials “phub” more often than most—though it may not be intentional.

“Compared to older generations, millennials feel much more pressure to respond immediately to text messages and instant messages,” said Felice Gabriel Miller, founder and president of Delvv®, a mobile app developer, in a release. “In the space between true smartphone addicts and regular users, there are probably a lot of people who use their smartphone excessively just to avoid the social consequences of disconnecting. This helps explain why people 'phub' (i.e., phone snub) in social settings where they know they shouldn't.”

Seventy-nine percent of millennials recently surveyed by Delvv respond to text messages within 15 minutes, compared to 56 percent of Gen X-ers and 46 percent of baby boomers. Forty-nine percent of the millennials surveyed respond to instant messages within 15 minutes—a contrast to baby boomers, 29 percent of whom respond to instant messages within 24 hours.

Most survey respondents (68 percent) believe that someone who is eating dinner with company should not look at a text message—“phub”—until after the meal.

The “phub” phenomenon speaks to the attachment most have to their smartphones—49 percent of those surveyed would rather give up sweets for one month than switch to a dumbphone.

When was the last time you “phubbed?”

Source: Delvv®
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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It's High Time for High-Tech Homes

August 1, 2016 2:10 am


More houses are turning into high-tech hubs of connectivity and convenience. Technology, in fact, has become one of the improvements most requested by homeowners, reports the Remodelers Council of the Greater Houston Builders Association (GHBA).

According to Matt Sneller, owner of Sneller Custom Homes and Remodeling in Spring, Texas, a low-voltage cabling and wiring infrastructure is the core of a connected home. The infrastructure supports everything from the alarm and audio systems to the HVAC and telephone.

Cameras are also a component in the connected home, says Bill Riley, owner of Bicycle Bungalows in Houston, Texas. Riley reports more of his clients are replacing costly security systems and monitoring services with self-controlled cameras.

LED lights are another sought-after, high-tech feature, due to their energy efficiency. Sneller recommends consulting with a cool lighting system company that offers products with geo-fencing technology, as well as smartphone control capability.

Appliance manufacturers have also joined the connected home club, now producing apps that allow homeowners to wirelessly control their appliances, and even take stock of the items within them, adds Riley.

According to Rob Douglass, owner of Texas Custom Patios, no high-tech home is complete without a connection to the outside. Douglass suggests installing a universal system that controls both indoor and outdoor features, such as a flat-screen television or surround-sound.

Source: Remodelers Council of the Greater Houston Builders Association (GHBA)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Sales by the Seashore: 10 Affordable Markets for Vacation Homebuyers

August 1, 2016 2:10 am


Location, location, location…an adage vacation homebuyers know all too well.

Turns out, there are beach towns that are not only in a prime location, but with homes at prime prices, too. According to a recent ranking by HomeUnion, the top 10 are:

1. Two Rivers, Wis.
Median Home Price: $85,300
Average Rent: $835

2. Angola, N.Y.
Median Home Price: $107,400
Average Rent: $1,180

3. Bayonet Point, Fla.
Median Home Price: $122,100
Average Rent: $1,193

4. Dexter, N.Y.
Median Home Price: $137,800
Average Rent: $1,294

5. Mastic Beach, N.Y.
Median Home Price: $138,200
Average Rent: $1,333

6. Oak Hill, Fla.
Median Home Price: $152,800
Average Rent: $1,126

7. Baltimore, Md.
Median Home Price: $184,600
Average Rent: $1,479

8. Jensen Beach, Fla.
Median Home Price: $213,900
Average Rent: $2,137

9. Cobb Island, Md.
Median Home Price: $222,000
Average Rent: $1,583

10. Berlin, Md.
Median Home Price: $236,200
Average Rent: 1,558

“Since home prices have remained low across the Midwest for the past few years, it's no surprise that Two Rivers, Wis., on the shores of Lake Michigan, tops our list,” says HomeUnion Director of Research Steve Hovland. “But there are still plenty of seaside bargains to be found throughout Florida, along the Atlantic Ocean, in expensive housing markets like suburban New York City, and even on the Pacific Ocean in California.”

HomeUnion compiled the ranking based on factors such as crime rate, inventory and proximity to specific bodies of water.

Source: HomeUnion
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Fear of the Unknown: Tips for Retirement Savers

July 29, 2016 2:07 am


(Family Features)—Recently released data show half of Americans are afraid they’ll outlive their income. This finding, from the Indexed Annuity Leadership Council (IALC), signifies a fear of the unknown in retirement: life expectancy and healthcare expense.

“Americans are living longer than ever, so it's no surprise that the No. 1 retirement fear is that they'll run out of money in their final years,” says Jim Poolman, executive director of the IALC. “Thankfully, there are strategies and products out there that can help you create sufficient retirement income to last throughout your lifetime, which can help with this crippling fear.”

Poolman and the IALC recommend beginning with a retirement budget—one that factors in all estimated costs, and can be adjusted periodically based on circumstance. Market volatility and career changes both should play a role, as well. Poolman says pre-retirees with a budget in mind save up to three times more than those without a plan.

Work toward a balanced retirement portfolio, Poolman advises. This may mean investing in a fixed indexed annuity (FIA) in addition to a 401(k). FIAs are ideal for those nearing retirement, because they are low-risk.

Set up automatic transfers to your retirement savings account(s) to avoid spending the money unnecessarily. Treat your account as a debt you owe to yourself, Poolman suggests—in effect, you are “paying yourself” every month.

Pre-retirees should monitor their savings balances more often as they close in on retirement age. Generally, the older you are, the less risk you are able to tolerate, Poolman says, and your savings may not recover in time.

Pre-retirees might also benefit from the services of a retirement advisor, Poolman adds. Seek out a reputable professional to discuss investment options with you, as well as keep you on track toward your savings goals before and during retirement.

Source: Indexed Annuity Leadership Council (IALC)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Is Your Lawn Suffering Summer Burnout?

July 29, 2016 2:07 am


It happens every year: your lawn burns out, browning as it succumbs to summer heat. What’s a homeowner to do?

Lawn grass needs water to thrive—even cool season grasses that go dormant in hot weather, says Mike McGroarty of MikesBackyardNursery.com. If your lawn hasn’t received water due to a hot, dry spell, there’s a chance some areas of it may die.

Burned-out lawns can be revived with an overseeder, which is a machine that drops grass seed into pockets of soil. An overseeder can be rented at a home improvement store, such as Home Depot.

Apply weed killer before overseeding, McGroarty recommends—weeds tend to grow in areas damaged by drought.

Home Depot advises homeowners to remove damaged grasses and dead weeds, out to a six-inch radius beyond the patch, before overseeding. Home Depot also suggests turning the soil to a depth of six inches, removing rocks or roots that could inhibit new growth, and adding compost or manure to the turned soil—this step will fortify the foundation of the lawn.

For more tips on overseeding, visit blog.homedepot.com.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Pokemon on Your Property? Insurance Covers It

July 29, 2016 2:07 am


Pokémon Go players have swarmed the streets, out in the real world, in real time—and causing real damage, as recent reports have shown.

Homeowners have little to fear (unless a Haunter appears), according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.). In most cases, homeowners insurance will cover damage brought on by players traversing property, as well as damage should a break-in occur.

Generally, homeowners (and renters) insurance policies cover damage caused to another’s property and possessions, and provide liability coverage for incidents, namely injury, on the property.

The I.I.I. recommends all homeowners and renters, Pokéfans included, take stock of the inventory in their homes—this will make the claims process much simpler.

“We think it’s great that people are getting outside and enjoying Pokémon Go,” said Loretta Worters, vice president of the I.I.I., in a statement, “but it’s important to be aware of your surroundings and be sure you’re adequately protected against risk.”

Source: Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Hot Tip: Maintaining the AC Unit

July 28, 2016 2:04 am


No homeowner wants to deal with an air conditioner out of commission, especially entering the stifling dog days of summer. To keep cool through the remainder of the season, maintaining the unit is key.

The first—and simplest—maintenance step is to change the filter in the unit. According to the experts at One Hour Air Conditioning & Heating, the filter should be swapped out every month, or as often as the manufacturer recommends.

The unit should also be kept clear of debris and unobstructed—One Hour’s experts say this allows the unit to function properly without consuming more energy than is necessary.

Have a service professional clean and inspect the unit, as well. He or she will be able to identify any issues before they become major (and expensive!).

Bear in mind that if the unit is not cooling effectively even after it has been serviced, it may be time to replace it, says Eric Corbett of Larry & Sons, Inc., a Maryland-based air conditioning, heating and plumbing company.

“Upgrading a home heating and air conditioning unit gives homeowners a chance to save money and control the temperature in their homes more efficiently,” Corbett says. “This can lead to significant savings when it comes to utility costs.”

Look for an ENERGY STAR® unit rated high in its seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), Corbett recommends. SEER indicates the relative amount of energy needed to cool a specific area–a high-rated unit may save up to half the energy of a lesser-rated product.

Size is also a factor when purchasing a new unit, according to Corbett—a unit that is too large will not eliminate humidity, and a unit that is too small will not cool.

Additionally, consider a unit with other energy-efficient features, such as an automatically-delaying fan switch, a fan-only switch, a filter check light, a thermal expansion valve or a variable speed handler, Corbett says.

An air conditioning unit that consistently works overtime will fail that much sooner, caution One Hour’s experts. Maintaining the unit will not only provide adequate relief from the heat, but also ensure it remains efficient and operational through the season.

Sources: Larry & Sons, Inc., One Hour Air Conditioning & Heating
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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